“Inevitable” recession will seriously derail federal finances

The government must apply the brakes on spending in the spring budget and focus on deficit reduction

“Inevitable” recession will seriously derail federal financesBy Jake Fuss, Milagros Palacios and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Fiscal prudence – the ability of the government to balance its budget and manage the finances of the country responsibly – is an increasing concern for Canadians. According to a recent Nanos poll, a majority of Canadians favour balancing the federal budget more than…

Undoing the damage to the Canadian economy

It will require a major shift in policy at both the federal level and in many provinces

Undoing the damage to the Canadian economyBy Jason Clemens and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute Anecdotes of Canadian firms leaving or diverting investments outside the country have continued unabated from 2018. The federal and many provincial governments seem reluctant to acknowledge this serious flight of capital. Reversing this trend, which is a major impediment to Canadian prosperity and well-being, will require…

Closing the gap on global inequality by every measure

From income to health to education, the metrics show improving conditions around the world

Closing the gap on global inequality by every measureAccording to recent news reports, economic inequality is on the rise. Since inequality is the gloomy backdrop for many policy discussions, it’s unsurprising that many people in the world’s wealthiest countries worry about the issue. However, very few are aware that this increase in inequality (the magnitude and causes of which are hotly debated) is…

Alberta should look abroad, and next door, for health care solutions

Spending continues to rise but Albertans have diminished access to care and face above-average wait times

Alberta should look abroad, and next door, for health care solutionsBy Bacchus Barua and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Albertans, like all Canadians, spend comparatively high amounts on health care but only receive modest performance from the system compared to other universal care countries. Thankfully, there’s much the province can (and should) do to improve its health-care system. According to the Canadian Institute for Health…

Student performance declines despite spending hikes in Alberta

Policy-makers in Edmonton and in school districts around the province must learn from other jurisdictions

Student performance declines despite spending hikes in AlbertaParents in Alberta are concerned about the state of elementary and secondary education. Results from the Provincial Achievement Tests (PATs) and international tests including the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) indicate alarming trends, particularly in math. Unfortunately, a pervasive myth that large cuts to education spending are responsible…

B.C. education system performs well while holding line on spending

B.C. financially supports parents who choose independent schools with per-student grants of up to 50%

B.C. education system performs well while holding line on spendingWhile other Canadian provinces experience decline in student performance despite increased education spending, in the opposite is true for British Columbia. The province’s kindergarten-to-Grade-12 education system is performing well while keeping spending on public education relatively low. Other provinces should look to B.C. to see that student achievement doesn’t require a large increase in spending.…

CPP takes bigger bite from Canadians

But much of the justification for expanding the pension plan is debatable or downright wrong

CPP takes bigger bite from CanadiansBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute Canadians likely noticed that their first paycheque of 2019 was slightly smaller than in 2018, even if they got a raise. The decline in after-tax income is because the first of several tax increases to finance an expanded Canada Pension Plan (CPP) took effect…

The tide of global freedom is receding, but there’s hope

Economic freedom liberates people from dependence on the powerful so they can build better lives without fear

The tide of global freedom is receding, but there’s hopeIs the world losing its taste for freedom as we move further into 2019? Two recent reports confirm the perception that freedom is under attack globally. The Human Freedom Index, a joint project of Canada’s Fraser Institute, U.S.-based Cato Institute and Germany’s Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom, measures freedom on a zero to 10 scale,…

Federal spending dangerously near record Canadian levels

Increasing the size and role of government almost always comes with larger deficits, mounting debt and/or tax increases

Federal spending dangerously near record Canadian levelsBy Jake Fuss, Milagros Palacios and Jason Clemens The Fraser Institute Fiscal prudence is a key aspect of any prime minister’s legacy. The choice to increase the size and role of government almost always comes with larger deficits, mounting debt and/or tax increases. Unfortunately, the federal government under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has ignored these…

B.C. mayors shaking down energy companies are ignoring reality

We know what a world without fossil fuels looks like – we used to live in it. It was cold, poor, dark, ignorant, starving and backwards

B.C. mayors shaking down energy companies are ignoring realityWest Coast Environmental Law, an advocacy organization based in Vancouver, has persuaded a group of British Columbia mayors and city councillors to write threatening letters to major oil and gas companies. The letters demand the companies pay large arbitrary sums to compensate for a list of supposed harms associated with greenhouse gases from fossil fuel…
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