U.S. visa change creates roadblock for Canadian workers

U.S. visa change creates roadblock for Canadian workersCanadian business travellers hoping to work in the U.S. face significant delays, apparently as fallout from that country’s America First executive order. The problem arises for Canadian workers who hold an L-1 visa. That specialized document is required for foreign nationals working for U.S. employers in specific daily business operations, typically managerial and executive positions.…

No, Boris Johnson isn’t another Donald Trump

When these two world leaders hold their first summit, the Boris and Donald Show will be a meeting of two unique and different political minds

No, Boris Johnson isn’t another Donald TrumpThe United Kingdom has had many impressive individuals serve as prime minister, including Robert Peel, Benjamin Disraeli, William Gladstone, Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher. One of the most intriguing political figures to enter 10 Downing St. in decades, Boris Johnson, has now joined this illustrious group. Johnson, a Conservative MP and former cabinet minister, has…

It’s getting impossible to escape from Trump

Our columnist hoped his summer vacation to Vancouver Island would be free of any overheated exchanges about the U.S. President. It wasn't

It’s getting impossible to escape from TrumpI’d really hoped that we wouldn’t meet over the summer vacation. I planned a summer kayak trip out of range of cellphones and far away from cities. And that part of the strategy really worked. He was nowhere to be seen in the Broken Group or even the Tiny Group of offshore islands in Barkley…

De Adder cartoon controversy is no laughing matter

Michael de Adder's contract termination by Brunswick News makes one wonder how far free speech and free thought truly go on a modern newspaper page.

De Adder cartoon controversy is no laughing matterMichael de Adder is one of Canada’s most well-known editorial cartoonists. Yet his recent involvement in a cartoon controversy is no laughing matter. His biting, satirical work has appeared in the National Post, The Hill Times, Halifax Daily News and Halifax Chronicle-Herald, among other papers. He’s also syndicated internationally through Artizans.com. De Adder parted ways…

China clearly has Canada’s number when it comes to food safety

China has played Canada in impressive fashion over the last six months and the meat ban is a masterful stroke

China clearly has Canada’s number when it comes to food safetyCanada is losing the food safety optics game against China. While Canada has demonstrated many times that its food safety record is outstanding – in fact, one of the best in the world – none of it matters now. Since Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei, was arrested in Vancouver in December 2018 on…

Why Trump will win in 2020

Blame free-market globalization, and the accompanying wage stagnation and declines in middle-class living standards

Why Trump will win in 2020Even Donald Trump’s most ardent supporters admit that he's impulsive and about as presidential as a bull in a China shop. In normal times, Trump would never have been nominated by the Republican Party and would certainly not have been elected president of the United States. But these aren't normal times. Far from it. After…

Three things business leaders could learn from Donald Trump

Take some time off for pleasure, don't hesitate when you need to fire someone and above all, play to win

Three things business leaders could learn from Donald TrumpFew politicians in recent history have polarized people the way Donald Trump has. Chances are you either love him or hate him. But whatever you think of him, there’s probably something you could learn from the American president. So what’s Trump doing that most business leaders could learn from? Let’s start with the obvious and…

Canadians have become habituated to howling for political effect

There’s still time to lower our voices, choose our words and stop talking long enough to listen to our neighbours

Canadians have become habituated to howling for political effectIt might be going a tad far to say overstatement is killing our democracy. Hyperbole in politics has been around since the world’s second oldest profession followed the world’s oldest profession into existence. U.S. President Donald Trump is hardly the first to have gained high office through gifted manipulation of the fibber’s foghorn. Yet we…

How Canada can benefit from the U.S.-Mexico dispute

Mexico has almost 130 million people, yet we’ve barely tapped into that market over the years

How Canada can benefit from the U.S.-Mexico disputeIn an unprecedented move last week, and in a single tweet, U.S. President Donald Trump imposed five per cent tariffs on all Mexican imports until the illegal immigration issue gets resolved. As the world now realizes, when the White House is willing to intertwine foreign and trade policies, markets around the world tumble. In fairness…

Why Western civilization is abandoning progress for populism

The shocking rise of identity politics has shattered social unity, which seems to be unraveling like a cheap carpet. And that led to self-centred white identity

Why Western civilization is abandoning progress for populismJesus said it first but Abraham Lincoln said it best: “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” We live in divisive times, with multiple challenges. But the greatest threat to our civilization is not climate change (as damaging as that may be), nor is it growing inequality or reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. The astonishing divide…

The primary function of U.S. presidential primaries

The process should help uncover the blemishes in a candidate – providing the other choices shine through

The primary function of U.S. presidential primariesJeb Bush recently suggested that someone ought to run against U.S. President Donald Trump in next year’s presidential primaries. It would, in Bush’s estimation, be good for the Republican Party. The underlying logic is simple. Rather than being a real Republican, Trump is an interloper who executed the political equivalent of a hostile business takeover.…

Approaching real problems with scientific problem-solving tools

Do we really think that the old legal-political-economic decision-making trifecta is up to the task of solving the world's problems?

Approaching real problems with scientific problem-solving toolsFew would argue with the proposition that how we think determines how we solve our problems. Just consider the past week. We’ve had what the mainstream media characterizes as a scandal in Ottawa. A strong member of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s cabinet, Jody Wilson-Raybould, has resigned and sought legal counsel on next moves from a…

Trudeau is wrong to back intervention in Venezuela

Apparently it’s wrong for Russia to interfere in U.S. or Canadian elections, but okay for the U.S. and Canada to pick Venezuela’s leader

Trudeau is wrong to back intervention in VenezuelaLast spring, much of the opposition in Venezuela boycotted a presidential election, which they lost. Canadian monitors of the election reported that they “witnessed a transparent, secure, democratic and orderly electoral and voting process” and “felt confident that the result of the elections represents the will of the majority of Venezuelans who voted.” Prime Minister…

Washington Consensus lit the fuse blowing apart the modern world

We’ve allowed market forces to replace a host of political-economic goals and considerations, and we’re far worse for it

Washington Consensus lit the fuse blowing apart the modern worldPax Americana, the long-standing U.S.-inspired post-war world order, is unravelling like a cheap carpet. Apart from catastrophes like Venezuela, Britain's chaotic retreat from the European Union, or the threat from President Donald Trump to pull the United States out of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, there’s the shocking rise of anti-western authoritarian regimes in Iran,…
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