Why the things we take for granted could be keys to innovation

Organizational cultures are ripe for change when the familiar starts to seem odd

Why the things we take for granted could be keys to innovationImagine having never seen a handshake. You would know nothing of the different levels of importance and intimacy, when it should be done, what’s happening during the shake and even whether you can learn something from the shake itself. Trying to learn about it all at once would be akin to learning a new language.…

Carbon-capturing material could help industry reduce emissions, costs

Offers an efficient way to pull carbon dioxide out of industrial emissions

Carbon-capturing material could help industry reduce emissions, costsAlberta’s world renown in carbon capture and sequestration is set to receive another lift thanks to the promise of a material invented and tested in the province that offers an efficient way to pull carbon dioxide out of industrial emissions. A team from the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Engineering characterized a CO2-capturing microporous material…

Infrastructure funding will drive innovation across the sciences

$27M from Alberta government goes to research in health, energy, environment, agriculture and astrophysics

Infrastructure funding will drive innovation across the sciencesAn investment of $27 million from the Alberta government will significantly boost research capacity and lead to innovations across the sciences at the University of Alberta. The provincial government announced recently that a four-year investment through its Research Capacity Program will be used to upgrade or create new facilities and infrastructure for 11 research projects.…

Alberta-based Quantum Silicon Inc. is ushering in the future of electronics

Manufactures atom-scale circuits that are faster and use far less energy

Alberta-based Quantum Silicon Inc. is ushering in the future of electronicsThe discovery that silicon could be used to make transistors smaller and more efficient in the late 1950s led to the invention of the integrated circuit – the basis for computers, cellphones and just about every other electrical device in use today – and signalled the dawn of the largest, most complex industry history has…

Physicists create new model to hunt for colliding neutron stars

Speeds up search to observe collisions in first hours when scientists can learn most

Physicists create new model to hunt for colliding neutron starsUniversity of Alberta physicists have created a new, simpler way to model collisions between neutron stars. The model will enable scientists to predict the brightness of early neutron star mergers more reliably than before – allowing telescopes to gain more information from these events. “Studying the light and electromagnetic waves emitted from these collisions allows…

Brain-computer interface connect people with assistive technologies

Device would allow children with severe mobility issues to control toys or wheelchairs with their minds

Brain-computer interface connect people with assistive technologiesImagine children with severe mobility issues being able to move their wheelchairs with their minds. That’s the idea behind a new brain-computer interface being developed by researchers at the Universities of Alberta and Calgary. Think2Switch is designed to be a simple and nearly universal bridge connecting brain signals to switch-enabled devices such as a wheelchair,…

Research bringing us closer to a cure for diabetes

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month

Research bringing us closer to a cure for diabetesAs part of the celebrations, we're revisiting five great stories showcasing the breadth of work being done at the University of Alberta in the journey towards a cure. For many of the 465 million people around the world living with diabetes, insulin is a lifeline. Since their bodies don’t produce enough of the hormone naturally…

Discovery shows promise for safer, more effective COVID-19 treatments

Protease inhibitor compounds interfere with the SARS-CoV-2 virus’s ability to replicate itself

Discovery shows promise for safer, more effective COVID-19 treatmentsA team of researchers at the University of Alberta has uncovered new antiviral agents that could lead to safer and more effective COVID-19 treatments than other drugs under development. In a recently published paper in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, the researchers identified novel protease inhibitor compounds that interfere with the SARS-CoV-2 virus’s ability to replicate…

Mentorship key to breakthrough science in women and children’s health

Placenta in a petri dish is just one innovation that attracts top students and research dollars

Mentorship key to breakthrough science in women and children’s healthJasmine Nguyen signed up for a tour of Meghan Riddell’s cell biology lab as a first-year undergrad in the Faculty of Science and was immediately hooked. “Meghan pulled a placenta out of what was basically a lasagna dish and it was love at first sight,” said Nguyen, who’s now working on her fourth-year honours thesis…

Students design space-saving ‘commander’s kits’ for Canadian military

Hoping for some new assignments from the military this fall

Students design space-saving ‘commander’s kits’ for Canadian militaryAs an undergraduate, Kai Keewatin was torn between two passions: graphic design and his long-held dream to join the Canadian Armed Forces. In the second year of his design program at the University of Alberta, he finally enlisted with Lord Strathcona’s Horse in Edmonton, graduating in his military uniform in 2016. He is now a captain…

‘Armchair rancher’ app helps beef producers get ahead of trends

Mixes agriculture with AI to help ranchers make better business decisions

‘Armchair rancher’ app helps beef producers get ahead of trendsNew University of Alberta research is mixing artificial intelligence with agriculture to help cattle ranchers. An analytic “armchair rancher” mobile app is being developed to help beef producers better manage various aspects of their herds. The smart device application will aid them – by leveraging the masses of data they already collect daily on factors…

Killer T cells could ignite immune response against cancer: study

Research brings cancer-killing cells to bear against a certain type of colorectal cancer tumour

Killer T cells could ignite immune response against cancer: studyA University of Alberta researcher has discovered how two signalling molecules recruit immune cells known as killer T cells to a specific type of colon cancer with more favourable patient outcomes. The finding may represent a therapeutic strategy to target other types of cancers. Kristi Baker, assistant professor in the Department of Oncology, examined tumours…

New device may improve life for people who have breathing challenges

Developers working to get it to market

New device may improve life for people who have breathing challengesA University of Alberta engineering duo is getting a boost from the university’s newly formed commercialization engine, imYEG, to get a new device for people with breathing challenges to market. Medical devices that assist people who have a low level of oxygen in their blood have evolved from large stationary tanks of compressed oxygen to…

U of A graduates rank among most employable in the world

Strong partnerships with employers help bring U of A into top 100 globally, top five in Canada

U of A graduates rank among most employable in the worldThe University of Alberta is ranked among the top 100 post-secondary institutions in the world and top five in Canada when it comes to preparing students for the workforce, according to the latest global ranking of graduate employability. The U of A is listed as 99th globally, 35th in North America and fifth nationally according…

What the future of energy looks like

Underpinning it all, like the safety net to a secure supply, will be fossil fuels

What the future of energy looks likeThe kingdom of Queen Elizabeth I was humming along quite nicely when, around the mid-1500s, Her Majesty caught wind of an environmental crisis in the offing. The forests were disappearing. Wood was the first energy source and had been so for millenniums. But kilns of industry and hearths of homes had been eating up the…
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