Canada must regain its competitiveness 

We need tax reforms and other initiatives that will help spur entrepreneurial spirit and encourage investment

Canada must regain its competitiveness Canada is gradually losing its competitiveness – but it can be regained. According to the International Institute for Management Development (IMD), a graduate business school and research centre, we’re down three spots from 2018 to 13th. Canada is now ranked below the United States and Switzerland, as well as other energy-dominated nations such as Norway,…

Where are health-care users in Alberta doctors’ contract dispute?  

The health-care system in theory exists for the benefit of Albertans. We pay the bills, yet we’re not at the table

Where are health-care users in Alberta doctors’ contract dispute?  By Charlie Fischer and Judy Birdsell IMAGINE Citizens Collaborating for Health It’s positive that the government of Alberta and physicians have created a working group to find a way to reach common ground in the current dispute over the doctors’ cancelled contract. Yet, IMAGINE Citizens Collaborating for Health, a citizen-led organization that aspires to support Albertans…

O’Toole gets a significant boost from Kenney

How one endorsement could change the federal Conservative leadership race, pushing MacKay into the background

O’Toole gets a significant boost from KenneyAlberta Premier Jason Kenney endorsed former Veterans Affairs minister Erin O’Toole in the federal Conservative leadership election on March 5. Quite a few political observers were surprised by his decision. Some wondered why Kenney did it so early, since a new leader won’t be chosen until June 27. Others were puzzled why he backed O’Toole,…

Billionaires, Beethoven and the Beatles enrich us all

The best way to enrich society is to encourage billionaires to produce even more. We should never tax creativity of any kind out of existence

Billionaires, Beethoven and the Beatles enrich us allAccording to many, confiscatory taxes should be levied against the wealthiest members of society until billionaires are taxed out of existence. Just ask devotees of U.S. Democratic Party luminaries Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, their ideological counterparts in left-wing circles in Canada, and even 62 per cent of the audience at a recent TVO debate…

Crime rises along with police budgets, yet cities are no safer

Toronto is a perfect example of a municipal system out of touch with effective policing. More money and new processes don't result in less crime

Crime rises along with police budgets, yet cities are no saferPolice services are once again hard at work preparing annual budget submissions for the next fiscal year. The cost of policing continues to mount year after year, and the justifications seem to repeat year to year as well. The budget for Canada’s largest municipal police force, the Toronto Police Service (TPS) now exceeds $1.2 billion,…

The grim reality of Canada’s medicare is in the details

Idyllic descriptions of medicare do not fairly represent the challenging realities that are the day-to-day experiences of many Canadians

The grim reality of Canada’s medicare is in the detailsAs the title suggests, The American Prospect article What Medicare for All Really Looks Like claims to describe the realities of Canadian medicare to our southern neighbours. So, it is both ironic – and disappointing – that a careful reading reveals it to be remarkable only in its unwillingness to examine these realities in any meaningful…

Federal deficit-spending plans put burden on taxpayers

As more resources go towards paying debt interest, the gap between what we pay in taxes and what we receive in services widens

Federal deficit-spending plans put burden on taxpayersBy Tegan Hill and Milagros Palacios The Fraser Institute Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau recently confirmed that, should a recession occur, Ottawa will turn on the spending taps using borrowed money. This government’s lack of fiscal discipline coupled with a willingness – if not outright enthusiasm – for even more deficit spending could imperil federal…

CPP doesn’t need to be overhauled, it needs to be killed

When it comes to how and how much workers should save for retirement, the federal government doesn’t know better than Canadians themselves

CPP doesn’t need to be overhauled, it needs to be killedAs the calendar flipped to 2020, the federal government again made the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) tax more expensive, even though CPP doesn’t help the economy or workers. The combined employee and employer contribution rate has risen from 10.2 per cent in 2019 to 10.5 per cent this year, while the maximum taxable amount (but…

Trudeau tax relief plan will do little for economic growth

Trudeau tax relief plan will do little for economic growthBy Jake Fuss and Finn Poschmann The Fraser Institute According to a Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) report released this week, the federal government’s plan to increase the basic personal income tax deduction will cost nearly $7 billion annually when fully implemented. This is not only higher than what the Liberals anticipated during last fall’s election…

Federal government tax cuts miss the mark

We need smart tax cuts that improve incentives for workers, entrepreneurs and investors, along with a balanced budget

Federal government tax cuts miss the markBy Jason Clemens, Jake Fuss and Tegan Hill The Fraser Institute Finance Minister Bill Morneau recently confirmed the federal government’s intention to reduce personal income taxes for everyone except “higher-income earners.” With total taxes (federal, provincial and local) consuming 44.7 per cent of the average family’s income in 2019, it’s easy to see why Canadians…

Municipalities need to rethink tax model

Property tax rates are much higher for businesses than home owners, which can cause serious problems, particularly when the economy falters

Municipalities need to rethink tax modelBy Josef Filipowicz and Steven Globerman The Fraser Institute When homeowners receive their annual property tax bill from city hall, they’re likely unaware that the shop down the street pays a higher property tax rate – probably much higher. For example, according to a new Fraser Institute study, in the Calgary area, the average commercial…

Throwing government money at all the wrong things

The Ontario government continually makes corporate welfare payments that fly in the face of social policy

Throwing government money at all the wrong thingsThe Ontario government’s public accounts should be a source of despair to any taxpayer. They provide the latest reminder that politicians are addicted to spending other people’s money and will spend it on just about anything. That a government program is without public demand or is unsupported by sound economic reasoning doesn’t deter governments from…

Health care wait lists make a mockery of the system

At its core, the problem is related to lack of funding. It's time for Ottawa to provide the necessary funds or launch full-scale medicare reform

Health care wait lists make a mockery of the systemMost Canadians think our health-care system is a national treasure and much superior to the American system, where poor people often don’t get the treatments they need and costs can be catastrophic. Instead of focusing on how Canada’s health-care system compares to America’s, we should be looking at European systems that offer better health outcomes…

Canada-U.S. disposable income gap widens

Over the past four decades, average real annual disposable income per capita rose 40% faster in the U.S. than in Canada, says a CIBC report

Canada-U.S. disposable income gap widensBy Troy Media Real disposable income per capita in Canada is currently $13,000 higher than it was in 1980. But in the United States, it’s US$25,000 higher, says a report released on Monday by CIBC. Over the past four decades, average real annual disposable income per capita in Canada has risen by 1.3 per cent,…
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